June 28, 2022

Gabriel Mann Biography, Age, Wife, Movies, Net Worth, Instagram

Gabriel Mann Biography

Gabriel Mann, born as Gabriel Wilhoit Amis, is an American actor and former model popular for Nolan Ross ‘ portrayal of the ABC drama series Revenge.

Gabriel Mann Age

He was born on 14 May 1972 in Middlebury, Vermont, United States. He is 46 years old as at 2018.

Gabriel Mann Height

The American actor stands at a height of 1.85 m.

Gabriel Mann Image

Gabriel Mann Family

He was born to Alice Mick (mother) and Steven Mick (father). He has a sister who is also an actress known as Alexandra Mann.

Gabriel Mann Wife | Married | Spouse

Mann is currently single. He was previously dating Rachael Leigh Cook, an American actress in 2001. They secretly separated later. For a long time, the actor has barely made headlines with the rumors of his relationship and partner. He’s not dating anyone and for now he’s not showing the hint of embarking on a romance.

Gabriel Mann Children

Mann has no children yet.

Gabriel Mann Movies And Tv Shows

Filmography

Film

Year

Title

Role

2014

Cesar Chavez

Bogdanovich Junior

2013

Zerosome

Michael “Lippy” Lippman

2011

Fake

Daniel Jakor

2010

Psych 9

Cole Hanniger

2008

Demption

Paul

2008

The Ramen Girl

Ethan

2008

80 Minutes

Alex North

2008

Dark Streets

Chaz

2008

The Rainbow Tribe

Mr. Murray

2008

The Coverup

Stu Pepper

2007

Love and Mary

Jake/Brent

2006

Valley of the Heart’s Delight

Jack Pacheco

2005

Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist

Father Francis

2005

A Lot Like Love

Peter

2005

Don’t Come Knocking

Earl

2005

The Big Empty

The Thoughtful Man

2005

Piggy Banks

Michael

2004

Sleep Easy, Hutch Rimes

Jesse Proudfit

2004

The Bourne Supremacy

Danny Zorn

2004

Drum

Jürgen Schadeberg

2003

The Life of David Gale

Zack Stemmons

2002

The Bourne Identity

Danny Zorn

2002

Abandon

Harrison Hobart

2001

Things Behind the Sun

Owen

2001

Josie and the Pussycats

Alan M.

2001

Summer Catch

Auggie Mulligan

2001

New Port South

Wilson

2001

Buffalo Soldiers

Pfc. Brian Knoll

2000

American Virgin

Brian

2000

Cherry Falls

Kenny Ascott

1999

No Vacancy

Michael

1999

Outside Providence

Jack Wheeler

1998

How to Make the Cruelest Month

Leonard Crane

1998

High Art

James

1998

Great Expectations

Owen

1998

Claudine’s Return

Kenneth

1996

I Shot Andy Warhol

Clean-cut boy

1995

Parallel Sons

Seth Carlson

1995

Stonewall

Rioter

Television

Year

Title

Role

2017–2018

Damnation

Martin Eggers Hyde, PhD

2016

Ray Donovan

Jacob Waller

2016

Rush Hour

Reginald Mason

2015

The Mysteries of Laura

Shane Allen

2011–2015

Revenge

Nolan Ross

2010–2012

The Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes

Bruce Banner (voice)

2009–2010

Legend of the Seeker

Young Zeddicus Zu’l Zorander

2008

Mad Men

Arthur Case

2008

Wolverine and the X-Men

Bruce Banner (voice)

2003

Carnivàle

Harlan Staub

2002

Jeremiah

Andrew Kincaid

2000

Time of Your Life

Ethan

1999

Fantasy Island

Cybil Hammond

1999

Dying to Live

Matthew “Matt” Jannett

1999

Wasteland

Justin

1997

Heart Full of Rain

Jacob Dockett

1997

ER

Carl Twomey

1996

Harvest of Fire

John Beiler

Gabriel Mann Net Worth

He has an estimated net worth of $2 million.

Gabriel Mann Revenge

He played  the role of Nolan Ross in the series.

Gabriel Mann Gay

The relationship of Mann with Rachael makes it clear that he is not a gay.

Gabriel Mann Twitter

Gabriel Mann Instagram

Gabriel Mann Interview

GABRIEL MANN

Updated: January 16, 2019

I understand that you were initially on track to become a doctor, studying pre-med at the University of Pennsylvania. What events led to your relocation to Los Angeles in pursuit of a career in film music?

I was a junior at the time. I was Pre-Med, but I was also majoring in music composition. Midway through my junior year, I was almost done with Pre-Med with one more semester of organic chemistry to go, but I was falling deeper in love with music. I just decided to stop Pre-Med and go full throttle in music. I didn’t know what I was going to do. I’m originally from San Antonio, where there’s not an entertainment business to speak of. I mean, there’s salsa and Tejano music, but there wasn’t a music industry in San Antonio. I became more of a musician once I got to college. Before that, I studied piano and learned to play by ear, but I wasn’t super into it.

Someone told me about the USC Film Scoring program, so I applied to it with a vague notion that, if all else failed, I could be a film composer or a composer for media. So, I got into the program, and that’s really what did it for me. I relocated here, and I’d never even been here before. My brother was moving to California at the same time, so it made it a little bit easier, but he was in Newport Beach. He’s an engineer, so we have entirely different pursuits. At the time, the USC program was one year of advanced studies. This was in ’95, ’96, so I attended under the tutelage of Buddy Baker. We had a lot of intriguing guest composers come through — Jerry Goldsmith, Leonard Bernstein, David Raksin, a lot of major guys from that generation.

Once the program was done, I stayed because I didn’t have anything else to do and figured that if I wanted to make music, it would be a good place to pursue it. I spent the next many years doing all manner of odd jobs that were at least loosely related to music in one way or another while making my own records as a solo artist. I basically did that up until 2005. I had made five albums while working as a wiring technician. I worked as an assistant to three different TV composers, taking hard drives around Los Angeles. I also recorded every acapella group in Southern California, producing and mixing their records.

I never gave myself 100% leeway to go off and tour forever, living in the back of my van and selling my records on the street. I always had a foot in the studio, recording people, mixing stuff, producing stuff, and every once in a while, I’d get a chance to write something for something. I was too worried about not being able to make rent. I was never willing to go willy-nilly into the night and not earn anything. So, I always found a way to earn as a musician. In doing so, I was introduced to a lot of interesting people —  a lot of people that I still work with today, a lot of people that have gone on to do exciting things. Most notably, I produced Sara Bareilles’ first record, which was the one that landed her a record deal.

It was all over a ten year period. I had come back from a big tour, opening for Alanis Morissette as a solo artist in Europe. That was the pinnacle and the end of my solo career. I made one more record after that, but my wife was pregnant and then had our first baby. Around this time, one of my old bosses, David Schwartz called me up, asking if I wanted to write some songs for this TV show he was working on called Arrested Development.

The songs were a result of Mitch Hurwitz [creator of Arrested Development]. He just had this idea that it would be funny to have songs in the place of score that would reference what was happening in the scene. At times, the songs were very specific. He would call and give us some ideas about what he was looking for, and then we would just make something funny. They were often soundalikes of a general style. If it called for a male vocal, I would often get to sing. That show was the first opportunity I had to really earn money as a musician and a writer.

David and I were writing the songs together, and when I would sing, it was a union vocal. It was a major change for me, going from being in bands and trying to earn money through ticket sales at the door and selling CDs to getting a royalty check in the mail. For many years, I had sort of sworn off this kind of work off because I wanted to make it as a rockstar. I pursued that path for many years, and when it wasn’t really happening, I was very, very glad that I could be of some service to someone. I was very thankful that David called me at that time.

That led to another chapter of producing a lot of music for bands, writing and singing for Arrested Development and co-composing other projects with David. It led to the first pilot I did on my own, another child, and another band called The Rescues in 2008. The band went on tour and got a major record deal. At the same time, I got a pilot that became a big hit called Modern Family and completed my first season. That was my first solo composing credit on a series. It was a crazy year.

That leads us to the beginning of the stage I’m in now — 10 years into writing music for TV shows as my own guy. The Rescues still exist. We’ve actually just made a cover of a Sarah McLachlan song that will be featured in Grey’s Anatomy in February. It’s awesome. I’ve worked in the same studio for 20 years, which was built by my friends, Chris and Becky. They were in a semi-pro acapella group that I joined when I first moved here. I still work with Becky a lot, and she works in the other room. Now, I have an assistant in the other room too. That’s the situation. That is life right now.

Let’s retrace your steps with composer, David Schwartz, whom you worked under and collaborated with on Arrested Development. What were the most valuable lessons you learned during your time with him that still prove relevant in your composing approach today?

David started in bands as a bass player and was making records. He has always been into making things sound great. He would spend as much time as it took on any given piece of music to make sure it sounded the way it was supposed to sound. I think that more than anything, is what I took away from him. You get good gear, you get good sounds, you hire as many live players as you can get in there with the budget, and you make it sound as great as possible. You really try, regardless of what the end use of it is. The piece of music may wind up being heard through a phone on the TV, but that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t make it awesome. You never know when you’re going to need to recall a piece of music, especially in the situation when you’re working for someone like Mitch Hurwitz. He’s like, “Hey, you know that thing that we used on the phone? What if we put that front and center in episode eight?”. His mind works like that. So, that’s something that I learned from working with David.

Source: popdisciple.com