July 4, 2022

Jeff Richmond Biography, Age, Height, Tina Fey, 30 Rock And Net Worth

Jeff Richmond Biography

Jeff Richmond is an American composer, actor, director, and producer. He is known for composing music for 30 rock, and  also directing some of its episodes. This sitcom was created by and starred his wife, Tina Fey.

Jeff execute, produced and composed the music for Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.  This is another sitcom created by his wife. For the first three seasons of 30 Rock he has won three Emmy awards for his production. For his composition of 30 Rock’s theme song Jeff has also been nominated for an Emmy . Jeff was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Original Score in 2018 for Mean Girls.

Jeff Richmond Age

Jeff was born on January 7, 1961 in Garrettsville, Ohio, U.S. He is 58 years old as of 2019.

Jeff Richmond Height | How Tall Is Jeff Richmond

Jeff stands at a height of 1.57 m.

Jeff Richmond Education

Jeff was born in Garrettsville, Ohio, U.S and  grew up in Portage County, Ohio.  In 1979 he  graduated from James A. Garfield High School in Garrettsville, where he won the John Philip Sousa award and where his mother still lives. He also played a key part in the creation of the Garrettsville Community Players, directing, choreographing, and lending his creative and artistic vision to many of its shows in its beginning. In the late 1980s he attended Kent State University in Kent, Ohio, where he co-authored a number of musicals, and wrote a musical score to William Shakespeare’s Othello.

Tina Fey Jeff Richmond | Tina Fey Husband Jeff Richmond

Jeff is married to Tina Fey, the creator and star of 30 Rock. The couple met while working at The Second City and dated for seven years before marrying in a Greek Orthodox ceremony on June 3, 2001. The couple has two daughters.

Jeff Richmond Photos

Jeff Richmond Net Worth

Jeff has an estimated net worth of $3 million dollars.

Jeff Richmond 30 Rock

In 2006 Jeff left SNL to produce and compose music for the situation comedy 30 Rock. He has also appeared as an extra on various occasions on 30 Rock, as the character Alfonso Disperioso; and, he directed five episodes: “Argus”, “Plan B”, “The Ballad of Kenneth Parcell”, “Today You Are a Man”, and “A Goon’s Deed in a Weary World” at thebeginning in 2010 .

Jeff Richmond Composer

As the composer he composed the score to the film Baby Mama in 2008, which starred his wife, Tina Fey, opposite Amy Poehler.

Jeff worked at The Second City and Child’s Play Touring Theatre before he became music director for the late-night television variety show Saturday Night Live. Richmond left SNL in 2006 to produce and compose music for the situation comedy 30 Rock. Richmond has also appeared as an extra on various occasions on 30 Rock, as the character Alfonso Disperioso; and, beginning in 2010, he directed five episodes: “Argus”, “Plan B”, “The Ballad of Kenneth Parcell”, “Today You Are a Man”, and “A Goon’s Deed in a Weary World”.

Jeff composed the score to the film Baby Mama, which starred his wife, Tina Fey, opposite Amy Poehler.

Jeff has also appeared in a recurring role on Late Night with Conan O’Brien as the short character of “Russian Hat Guy”.

Richmond is a recipient of the Child’s Play Touring Theatre 2012 Victor Award.[6]

Richmond wrote music for the Broadway stage adaptation of Mean Girls, which had its out of town Broadway tryout in Washington, DC. The musical began previews on Broadway March 12, 2018 and opened officially on Broadway on April 8, 2018.

Jeff Richmond Interview

 Jeff’s interview about their stiff competition after they were Nominated in 2013

Walk me through your morning as these announcements were coming out. What were you doing?
My wife and I were up early because we have a child that’s 2 years old, so she gets up at seven. So we’re up with her and we have to walk the dog, because we have a dog. Everybody’s taking their craps, their dumps. Some of them go outside and some of them come inside. Then we’re having coffee and we’re trying to find when the — where, actually, where to find [the Emmy nominations]. Where were they on TV? Was it on E!? You know, we finally found it around 8:30 or 8:40, and we were all eating cereal. And we thought, Oh, here they come. That’s great! Great news, very good. It was very — is unglamorous a word? It was not glamorous. We weren’t up early and having a Champagne breakfast and waiting. We’re at the office now. We’re all planning on going out this afternoon and maybe having a boozy lunch. We’re looking forward to that.

Boozy lunches are always good.
You’ve got to — and it’s hot. So the best thing you can do is drink a lot of booze in the middle of the afternoon, in the middle of a heat wave. That’s how you celebrate New York–style.

I’m sure you’re still basking in the glow, but have you sized up your competition in the Original Music Category yet?
Oh, you know. I have to look again. Can you remind me?

You’ve got two songs from Smash that you’re competing against.
Those will be great.

You’ve got the opening number from last year’s Tony Awards —
That was fucking great, yeah.

A song from Nashville and then a song from The Neighbors that was written by Alan Menken, so there’s a strong Broadway contingency here. It’s a tough category.
Oh, you know … Jen, don’t think I think we’re going to win. I just like the trip. I am not holding out any hope of winning, but it will be nice to be there with those people. They’re all very nice people. Last year we got to sit poolside at The Four Seasons with Marc Shaiman and we got to, like, just sit around. It’s always a good time.

When you sit poolside with Marc Shaiman, do you sing? Because in my fantasies, you would just sing.
Yes. That’s what composers do. They sing. They drink mimosas and sing all the time. That’s why we’re so happy and gleeful.

Here’s an argument for why you might win. This is the first time, to my knowledge, that an original piece of music containing the word flerm has ever been nominated for an Emmy Award. How does it feel to be a groundbreaker in that regard?
“These are the best days of our flerm.” You’re right! That may sway peer groups. I had not considered that yet.

You might want to use that in your Emmy campaign.
“Remember that these were the best days of our flerm.” I think that’s great. We did find great joy every time that we would see that at the end of the episode. “That’s nice, we ended our seven years of television with the word flerm.” There’s great poetry there somewhere, right?

I assume you haven’t thought about your acceptance speech yet, but really, the time is now. Do you imagine composing something special if you win?
Maybe I would just read the lyrics, just go with the beauty of  the lyrics: “The Irma Luhrman-Merman murder / Turned the bird’s word lurid. Good night! Thank you!”

I feel like there’s an opportunity for three-part harmony, considering that three of you are nominated.
You’re right. Knowing Tracey and Tina, we’d have to rehearse all summer to pull that off. We should definitely try. I guarantee you that if we win, Jen, if for any reason we win, somebody will sing in three-part harmony up there.

Is that a promise?
That’s a promise.

This is going to go in writing.
Go ahead  and write it out. Maybe that is what we need to win: Tina Fey, Tracey Wigfield, and Jeff Richmond will sing in three-part harmony at the acceptance speech.

 Adopted from: www.vulture.com