November 29, 2022

Lauren Potter Biography, Age, Down syndrome, Husband, Engagement, Movies and Net Worth

Lauren Potter Biography

Lauren Potter born Lauren Elizabeth Potter on May 10, 1990, is an American actress, best known for her role as Becky Jackson in the television show Glee. She serves as an advocate for those with disabilities through organizations including AbilityPath, Best Buddies International, the Down Syndrome Association, the American Association of People with Disabilities, and Special Olympics.

Lauren Potter Age

Born on 10th May 1990, Lauren is 28 years old as of 2018.

Lauren Potter Height

She is 1.45 metres tall.

Lauren Potter Married – Husband

She has remained tight lipped when it comes to her love life thus its not known if she is dating, engaged or single. However she is not married.

Lauren Potter Engaged

According to multiple news sites, on August 3, 2016, Lauren’s childhood-friend-turned-boyfriend Timothy Speare had proposed to her with a promise ring on July 31. Having been born with Down Syndrome, their families had known each other since they were babies. However, it was announced on February 22, 2017, that their engagement had ended over the holidays.

Lauren Potter Glee

Potter obtained her first acting role, at the age of 16, starring in the film, Mr. Blue Sky.

From 2009 to 2015, she played the recurring role of Becky Jackson, a cheerleader with Down syndrome, in all six seasons of the TV show Glee. In the show, cheer leading coach Sue Sylvester, part played by Jane Lynch, takes a special interest in Becky in part because Sue’s older sister, Jean, also has Down syndrome. She was nominated in 2012, for a SAG award in the Ensemble in a Comedy Series category for her work in Glee. Lauren also received the SAG/AFTRA Harold Russell Award at the 2012 Media Access Awards.

Lauren Potter Chicago Med

She made a guest appearance in the film, Chicago med in 2019 as Barbara Duncan on the Episode “The Thing We Do”.

 Lauren Porter Appointment – Barack Obama

Former President of United State, Barack Obama appointed Potter, in November 2011, to the President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities, where she would advise the White House on issues related to that population. There are twenty-one members in the committee along with 13 U.S. federal government staff. The committee would discuss a variety of different issues affecting those with disabilities including items such as education and workplace integration issues, during periodic meetings throughout the year.

In 2015, Potter was cast as Jenny in the short film Guest Room, which premiered at SXSW. She portrayed the character of a young woman with Down syndrome, who dealt with the difficulties of an unplanned pregnancy.

Lauren Potter Net Worth

Details are under review.

Lauren Potter And Jane Lynch

Lauren Potter Instagram

Twitter

Lauren Potter Interview

Glee’s Lauren Potter Has a Message For Hollywood on Hiring People With Down Syndrome: “You Won’t Be Disappointed”

Adopted From: popsugar.com

POPSUGAR: Growing up, how did you handle people telling you that you wouldn’t be able to have the dream career you wanted?

Lauren Potter: I did have people that told me that I couldn’t do certain things, so, as I always say, I only listened to those who told me I could. My parents told me I could do anything as long as I tried hard. My mom did tell me that acting would be hard, but also that I could do it!

PS: Did you always know you wanted to be an actress? How did you go about making your dreams come true?

LP: Yes, absolutely. I performed all the Disney movies for my family and friends, and I also knew all the Disney songs and dances. I don’t sing well, but I love to sing a lot! I just knew I wanted to act. I started dance classes when I was 3 and just loved performing. I knew then that acting was the career for me.

PS: What’s one obstacle you’ve overcome in your career that you’re really proud of?

LP: I’m really proud that I have Down syndrome and have been able to grow as an actor and show the world that Down syndrome doesn’t stop me, and that I think I’ve become a really good actor. And I think I have some part in opening the doors for other actors with disabilities.

PS: What’s something you still struggle with?

LP: I sometimes struggle to overcome life’s challenges to become who I want to be. I just want to be accepted for who I am, and to be like everyone else. I want people to know who I really am and who I will truly be. I’m working hard on becoming the best I can be. Right now, I struggle with getting back to work and having someone recognize what I’ve accomplished and giving me another chance in a great role.

PS: Was there ever a moment you thought you couldn’t do it? If so, how did you push through that?

LP: I guess so, but I have a lot of people around me who tell me to get off my butt and try harder. I think I used to feel that way when I was younger, but I’ve grown up a lot and have learned to push through. I sometimes get discouraged when I have an audition and I don’t get the part, but I know I just have to keep trying!

PS: What advice do you have for someone else with a disability who wants to have a career and follow their dreams?

LP: Well, don’t ever give up your dreams, no matter how hard it is or how impossible it seems! I want all people with or without disabilities to follow their hearts, follow their paths, and never give up their dreams. I hope I am proof that it can happen!

PS: What advice would you give to your younger self who was just starting out in her career?

LP: I would tell myself not to be afraid or scared or nervous around others, and to always be my very best self. I think I was a little difficult when I was younger, and I wouldn’t be like that again.

PS: What do you want employers to know about people with Down syndrome applying for jobs?

LP: Employers should know that they will not go wrong hiring a person with Down syndrome. Not only will they be helping someone reach their goal of working, but they and other employees will learn so much about acceptance and love. Everyone I know with DS works hard and gives 100 percent of themselves. We’re all more alike than different!

PS: What are some misconceptions about people with disabilities in any type of workforce?

LP: I don’t really know, but I guess maybe they think we can’t do the job, or that it will take too much time to help us learn, but that just isn’t true. When I was on Glee, I always knew my lines and everyone else’s, too! I never held up filming because I wasn’t ready. I worked very hard and was always on time.

PS: What’s your favorite part about your job?

LP: I love being part of a cast and crew on set. I love acting, and even learning my lines. And of course, craft service isn’t too bad either!

PS: What’s your dream acting role?

LP: I love any kinds of acting roles. I’m really good at comedy, but I would also really like to do a dramatic role, but really I love everything. My dream role would be one that wasn’t just for someone with Down syndrome, but a really good, strong role for a young woman who is just a good actor.

PS: What’s the best career advice you’ve ever gotten?

LP: Jane Lynch who played Sue Sylvester on Glee once told me in the very beginning of filming when I was still scared: “I know you’re new to this, but everything is OK. I’ll be here if you want me to help you go over your lines, or just be your friend. You will be awesome.” She was always there for me and helped me grow as an actor.

PS: You’ve had some really awesome roles in your career so far! What’s been your favorite and why?

LP: Of Course, I would have to say Becky on Glee. That was so fun and in the six years I was on the show, they let me do some really fun things. There were some scary and dramatic things, too, like when Becky brought a gun to school. But also some really fun ones, like “The Rocky Horror Glee Show” episode, being Lady Gaga and Max the dog from Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch, the secret service for Sue, and of course, Helen Mirren doing my voice over (are you kidding me!!!). It was so much fun, and I loved the cast and crew and Ryan, Ian, Brad, and Dante. I didn’t want it to ever end!

PS: Who is your favorite actor/actress you’ve ever worked with? Why?

LP: I love, love, love Jane Lynch. She’s so awesome and was always there for me. One of my favorite actors is John Stamos because he’s so cute and hot and I LOVED him on Full House and Fuller House. When we worked together on Glee, they called me “Mrs. Stamos” on set because I had a huge crush on him, which was so funny.

PS: What’s your advice for how directors/producers/casting directors can make the entertainment industry more diverse and inclusive?

LP: I always say, think outside of the box (my mom taught me that) and give us a chance. You will not be disappointed. I want to be seen as an actress first, then as a really good actress who happens to have Down syndrome. But just because you have DS or some other different ability, that doesn’t make you a good actor, you have to work hard and prove you can do it. I just want to be seen as the best actor for the role because I’ve shown I have what it takes.

PS: Have you seen any changes over the years in how inclusive the entertainment industry has become for people with disabilities?

LP: That’s a hard question for me, but I think shows like Glee have made a difference. I still think we need to have more chances, though, and there is still a lot of work to do.

PS: What do you feel is a common misconception people may have about people with disabilities? What do you want to say to people with those misconceptions?

LP: I think people think that we are different with different feelings, but we are WAY more alike than different. I want what everyone wants: to be accepted for me, to have friends, to love someone, and have someone love me, to live independently, to work at my career, to have family and friends around me, and to enjoy living my life.

PS: Who are your biggest role models? Why?

LP: My biggest role model is my mom because she’s my number one fan. She’s been an awesome and amazing mom, and she’s my true friend and my true inspiration.

PS: What projects are you working on now?

LP: I’ve had a couple of auditions, which sadly I didn’t get the roles, but right now I’m waiting for more work. I’m still speaking around the country to tell my story and fight against bullying. I’m waiting for that next great role, and I hope it’s coming soon, because I’m SO ready!