July 4, 2022

Memphis Bleek Biography, Age, Family, Career, Albums, Songs

Memphis Bleek Bioraphy

Memphis Bleek, born as Malik Deshawn Cox as his real name. Bleek is an American rapper, best known as the CEO of his own labels Get Low Records and Warehouse Music Group.During his career journey Bleek has released four albums,of the four,two went Gold by the RIAA.

Memphis Bleek Age

Memphis is 40 year old as of 2018. he was born on June 23,1978 in  Brooklyn, New York.

Memphis Bleek Family

The is no reliable information about his family, since he  has always hidden his family background and other personal life details from the media and the public

Memphis Bleek Wife

He married his longtime girlfriend Ashley Coombs, on 13 December 2014 in a ceremony held in the evening at The Merion situated in Cinnaminson, New Jersey.

Memphis Bleek Career

He is the founder of Warehouse Music Group and the CEO.

He featured in the Jay-Z one track ” Coming of Age” where after a successful released he signed a contract with Roc-A-Fella records

He worked on his second album where after coming out with the album “The Understanding”teh album reached top rank on U,S R$B chart. His album with Gold in 2001 was certified by the Recording Industry Association Of America.

Besides his Rapping career,he has also appeared on the Cinemascope in 2002 with a role with Beanie Sigel,Damon and Jay-Z “sTATE Property”.

Memphis Bleek Photo

Memphis Bleek Net Worth

The American actor has an estimated net worth of 2.5 million dollars

Memphis Bleek Songs

  • Is That Your Chick
    The Understanding · 2000
  • Memphis Bleek Is…
    Coming of Age · 1999
  • Dear Summer
    534 · 2005
  • Round Here
    M.A.D.E. · 2003
  • Do My
    The Understanding · 2000
  • What You Think of That
    Coming of Age · 1999
  • Infatuated
    534 · 2005
  • I Get High
    The Understanding · 2000
  • We Get Low
    The Understanding · 2000
  • Regular Cat
    Coming of Age · 1999
  • Like That
    534 · 2005
  • PYT
    The Understanding · 2000
  • Stay Alive in NYC
    Coming of Age · 1999
  • Hood Musik
    M.A.D.E. · 2003
  • All Types of Shit
    The Understanding · 2000
  • Smoke the Pain Away
    534 · 2005
  • Murda Murda
    M.A.D.E. · 2003
  • Everything Is a Go
    M.A.D.E. · 2003
  • Bounce Bitch
    The Understanding · 2000
  • Who’s Sleeping
    Coming of Age · 1999
    Straight Path
    534 · 2005
  • Understand Me Still
    M.A.D.E. · 2003
  • Bounce Bitch
    The Understanding · 2000
  • Who’s Sleeping
    Coming of Age · 1999
    Straight Path
    534 · 2005
  • Understand Me Still
    M.A.D.E. · 2003
  • I Won’t Stop
    Coming of Age · 1999
    Need Me in Your Life
    M.A.D.E. · 2003
  • First, Last and Only
    534 · 2005
  • Why You Wanna Hate For
    Coming of Age · 1999
    Just Blaze, Bleek & Free
    M.A.D.E. · 2003
  • Roca-A-Fella Get Low Respect It
    M.A.D.E. · 2003
  • I Wanna Love U
    M.A.D.E. · 2003
  • Hater Free
    534 · 2005

Memphis Bleek Jay Z

He grew up in the same neighborhood as J-z where he was one of the artists signed to Roc-A-Fella Records, as protégé to Jay-Z as well as appeared in J-Z’S album.

Memphis Bleek 534

534 album is his fifty studio album.The album contain 14 songs inclusive of the hit single “Like That”

Memphis Bleek Coming Of Age

Coming of Age album is the rappers first album and was released on August 3,1999 and it was certified Gold y the RIAA for shipment of over 500,000 units.

Memphis Bleek Albums

  • Coming Of Age
  • The Understaning
  • M.A.D.E
  • 534

Memphis Bleek Infatuated

It is his single song from the album 534

Memphis Bleek The Understanding

These is his second album to be released on December 5, 2000.By the time whe get to October 2002 the album got certifition gold by the RIAA.

Memphis Bleek Video

Memphis Bleek Instagram

 

Memphis Bleek Interview

PUBLISHED: 

SOURCE: https://www.complex.com

Are you going to be performing at Jay Z’s B-Sides concert?
I hope so. It’d be a great look. I was on a few of those b-sides. [Laughs.]

I’ve got to say “Celebration” off of the Streets Is Watching soundtrack. It was me, Jay Z, Sauce Money, and Wais P.

Tell me your thoughts on Tidal. People have been criticizing it a lot lately.
I really don’t know too much about the Internet world. I’m brand new to it myself. I don’t have Pandora and I don’t have Spotify, but you know that I’ve got Tidal because I’m riding for my crew. I think, because Jay Z’s behind it, the expectations are high. When you’re associated with greatness, people expect everything that you do to happen overnight. Sometimes greatness takes time, even when you’re Jay Z. People don’t know the Jay Z that I saw coming up. They don’t know the Jay from “I Can’t Get With That” or the Jay on the record with Big Daddy Kane and Shyheim. Nobody knows that Jay.

They just know the successful Jay. They know that you’re here now, but they didn’t see the hard work that came before. Everything takes hard work. It’s always greater later, not in the beginning.

You have your music on Spotify and on Tidal. Can you tell us the difference between the two from the perspective of an artist?
Honestly, when I get my next check, I can break down who pays more or whatever. Tidal is new so I haven’t received a check from Tidal yet. But, unless you’re a label owner, who really knows what the artist gets? The artist is never really going to find out any of that information. If the artist has all of that information, then there’s no room for the label. I do business deals with Tidal right now because I’m an independent company.

Me and my partner just did a deal with Tidal for our royalty revenue and our publishing revenue to be streamlined back directly to us because there is no label. We are the label. So I don’t know how other artists will go about that.

So you’re moving independently now?
Definitely. The music game is all about touring now. It’s all about putting out singles. Albums really don’t sell that much, but that doesn’t mean that people don’t have the album. They’re available for free on all of these torrent sites that everyone’s on. It’s not like the fans don’t have the album. It’s just that they didn’t have to go buy it. So, the best thing to do is to keep people coming out to your shows. That’s the only way the artist can eat.

Do you have a new album coming out?
Not at the present moment. I’ve been out of the game for a minute. My last album came out years ago, so I’m not that guy that’s going to jump in and be like, “Hey, y’all. I’ve got an album coming out this month. Go buy it.” That’s not going to make these young kids go buy a Memphis Bleek record right now. They’re not checking for me. They’re checking for Young Thug and the rest of the new dudes.

I’ve got to get back in the ring and put my gloves back on and get back to the fight. That’s what I’m doing with this first single. I’ve got my own label, Warehouse Music. We’ve got an artist from Barbados. We’ve got King A1 from Dade County.

I’ve got this group out of Ireland too. We’re all spread over. We’re also working on some production in Helsinki, Finland, was an artist over there named Mikael Gabriel. We’re making moves and doing this international thing.  I want to see the young talent around me become more successful than I ever was.

Jay just sent somebody out to Nigeria to look for talent.
Yeah, my old manager Ty Ty out there in Nigeria. He’s got the stupid big mansion out there. I’m about to go down and see what’s up. I’ve got people in Africa, man. People can’t believe what they see on TV. Africa is a beautiful place. Everybody’s got a place to go home. Think about Latin America. Dominicans, Puerto Ricans, Mexicans—they all go back home and go visit their country. Africa is ours. We’ve got to go home. Everybody can go home but us? That’s impossible. You can’t believe what you see on TV. I’d love to take people to Johannesburg and show them that it’s more beautiful than anything you could imagine in your life.

You’ve got a bunch of classic records under your belt. Do you perform those old Roc records when you go on tour?
Yeah, all day. You can never forget who you are. That’s who I am. Roc-A-Fella is in me forever. Before Roc-A-Fella got a deal with Def Jam, I was the guy putting up “In My Lifetime” stickers in Brooklyn. So, the Roc is bigger than record labels and record deals. It’s something that started in the project hallways. I’ve been down with it from day one so I would never turn my back on the classics we’ve made.

Tell us a little bit about the new record. Is it a street record? Is it a club record?
It’s everything wrapped in one. I don’t like to categorize music. There’s only two types of records in my world: hot and not. That’s it. I don’t care where the record’s from. I listen to Green Day and I don’t even know what they’re saying. It’s either hot or it’s not. This record right here is hot. I’m not just saying that because it’s my record.

I knew it when I heard the beat and the hook and everything. I knew that this was the record and this was the message that I wanted to put across. No disrespect to any other artists that came up, but in the last few years I’ve seen different artists break into this game and become successful and every one of these blogs compared them to me.

“They sound like a better Bleek.” “They’re a new Memphis Bleek.” “They’re a more informed Memphis Bleek.” From the Meek Mills to the Juelz Santanas to everybody. I done heard it. It’s no disrespect to anybody, but don’t compare me to anybody. There’s nobody like me. My own mama ain’t nothing like me. [Laughs.]

Comparisons are easy. They happen in sports too. People compare LeBron to Michael Jordan and Magic Johnson. It’s just a natural thing that people do.
You’re right. But I’m pretty sure that Mike’s leaning back in his crib looking at his rings thinking, “They ain’t nothing like me.”

What songs would you like to see Jay Z perform at the B-Sides concert?
I would love to see Jay perform stuff like “So Ghetto,” “It’s Like That,” and “Success.” I want to see all of that. I’m a fan at the end of the day. Before I ever thought about him becoming something so great, I always thought Jay was the best. Nobody could tell me that my man wasn’t the best. “It’s Like That” is one of my favorite Jay records of all time. That and “Never Change.” “Never Change” is probably Jay’s hardest record. There’s a couple of them. He’s got too many records. We have to decide to cut some of them when we’re doing tours.

The hood fucks with the b-sides more than the singles anyway.
That’s right. When we buy an album, we skip the singles. I don’t want to hear the song that you made a video for by the time I buy your album.

Are you aware that you’re synonymous with durags?
I know, man. I should’ve patented that. I was too young. All I cared about getting was a car and fucking everybody’s girl. That was my goal in life back then. I wasn’t thinking about patents, clothing deals, or shoe lines. These young guys today kill me. [Laughs.]